A Great First Lady Cares

Hawai‘i’s first lady, Dawn Amano-Ige, is a wife (married to Gov. David Ige), a mother of three, a sister and a daughter. Dawn’s mother, Mitsue Amano, provided childcare for the Ige kids when Dawn was a young, working mother and David was a new legislator. Today, at 94 years old, Mitsue is no longer the family’s caregiver. That’s now Dawn’s role.

Heavyweight Volunteer: Stuart Ho

The men in Stuart Ho’s family have been heavy weights in business for three generations. His father, legendary developer Chinn Ho, turned the ‘Ilikai into the state’s first high-rise luxury resort in the 1960s. Stuart served on the boards of such notable companies as Aloha Airlines, Gannett Co., and Pacific Resources in a long and successful career as state legislator, attorney and executive. Today, son Peter Ho is continuing the family tradition of business stewardship as president and CEO of Bank of Hawai‘i. At 75, Stuart is busier than ever in retirement.

Dr. Rio Banner, MD: Health Visionary

In Hawaii, we live an average of 81 years— longer than almost anywhere else in the world. But when it comes to successful aging, the key is to not only live longer, but to live longer as a healthy individual. The way to better health is taking care of ourselves as we age, which helps prevent the decline of our physical and mental abilities. And although any doctor would agree with that, the health care industry has traditionally emphasized treatment over prevention.

Behind the Scenes with Kirk Matthews

GM: Where did you grow up? In a big city? Or small-town America? KM: I grew up in little towns all around Oregon. I went to high school on a former Indian reservation, Siletz. Graduating class of 12. GM: What was your first job? Was it in media or in a different field?
KM: My first broadcasting job was in Coos Bay Oregon at a small radio station. I had the opportunity to do EVERYTHING. It was a great learning experience.

An Interview with Leslie Wilcox

Our “can do!” island culture values resourcefulness and cooperation when faced with challenges. “We know a guy” and where to get things, and have honed skills tūtū taught us. We don’t expect anything in return for helping out. “If can, can; if no can, no can.” We put ourselves to the task. PBS Hawai‘i (KHET or KMEB call letters in your guide) is our TV station. Our donations built it and it serves us. But don’t take it for granted.

Kawaiahaʻo Church – Keeping the Faith for 200 Years

In his epic historical novel Hawai‘i, James A. Michener created fallible heroes and villains who have lived in our memories for over 60 years now. But when the missionaries are interpreted in the norms of their times, the tenets of their beliefs, we see their abiding faith to bring the gospel of peace to Henry Ōpūkaha‘ia’s people. The fruits of their labor persist, and in 2020, we celebrate 200 years of teaching God’s word and singing sacred hymns that inspire faith, hope and love.

Choosing Peace: Our Care, Our Choice

Dying at home can be traumatic for loved ones. We long for a peaceful walk into a beautiful sunset. But most have never seen anyone die and that first indelible experience will stick with us. We may wish to die in our sleep, suffer an accident where we “never knew what happened” or drop dead while enjoying a favorite activity. But the odds are even — just as many people suffer and fight death to the last breath. Loved ones who witness such death throes simply don’t talk about it.

The Gift of Food

We know how food gets distributed at the market to people who can afford to buy it. For those who can’t, every day, a network of Hawai‘i nonprofits work together to collect food donations and deliver them to the hungry. They serve seniors on a fixed income, low-income families, disabled persons and homeless persons who may not be getting enough food to sustain health or the energy to work.

CITY MILL SENIOR VALUE

In July, City Mill Ltd. will celebrate 120 years of business in Honolulu. Their success is grounded in four generations of family wisdom. Our grandparents and parents loved shopping there, and today, we receive that same kindly respect and assistance every time we visit the store. Vice President Carol Ai May and President Steven Ai are the third generation of their family running City Mill. This brother and sister are also part of a group of family caregivers who assist their mother and stepmother, now in their nineties. Their family culture of helping others began in the 1890s.

I Ke Aloha a Nā Mele Kahiko o Hawaiʻi (“Because for the love of the old songs of Hawai’i)

It’s Sunday afternoon! “Welcome to ‘Territorial Airwaves,’” echoes the AM940 Hawai‘i announcer, followed by a long steamy blast of a cruise ship’s horn. And then, like a playful ocean breeze, the cadence of Harry B. Soria’s happy voice bids us e komo mai and stay awhile. Gently, he calls us back to simpler days with the hapa-haole and not-so-haole music of old Hawai‘i — passed down in families and among Hawai‘i musicians for a hundred years.

Medical Cannabis: A Therapeutic Resource for Seniors

Since 2017, licensed Hawai‘i cannabis growers have been formulating and dispensing medical products to qualified state-registered patients. A majority of their clients who are benefiting from cannabis treatments are seniors. Maui Grown Therapies dispensary in Kahului has been open over a year. Leading their Science & Medical Advisory Board is Dr. Andrew Weil, director of the University of Arizona Center for Integrated Medicine, an advocate for alternative medicine and an early pioneer in the research of medical cannabis.

Runninʻ On Aloha with Carole Kai

From a very young age, Carole Kai showed a flair for the dramatic — sometimes pulling a bedsheet off the clothesline and holding it tightly across her shoulders while flying around the backyard like a superhero. Other times, she showed a more businesslike approach — like the time she hosted a boxing match in her backyard and sold tickets to neighborhood kids for 5 cents apiece.

Caregiving in the Cycle of Life

Former first lady Rosalynn was a caregiver herself and she believed that family caregiving is a cycle of life that touches everyone. Here, four people, each at a different point on the cycle, share their care stories from the heart, offering words of wisdom and points of caution. As you read, consider your journey on the Cycle of Caregiving. Where are you? Are you prepared?

Go For Broke

It’s taken local girl Stacey Hayashi more than 15 years to bring this story of the 100th/442nd and MIS to the big screen. Her dream — to perpetuate stories like this for today’s youth and for future generations — took perseverance and sacrifice, like that of the veterans she passionately honors with this film.

Romancing the Dance

Faith and Benny Agbayani celebrated their 49th wedding anniversary this year, and both agree that the success of their partnership is doing things together. Maintaining a close relationship is more than saying, “I love you;” it’s taking on challenges as a team, mastering new skills and learning together. Overcoming obstacles in life requires commitment, sacrifice and a willingness to cooperate. The Agbayanis do all these things well, but simply call it “sticking together.”

Frank B. Shaner

With a desire to express himself, comedian and media personality Frank B. Shaner moves from the mic to paint palette. Toward the end of 2011, popular radio personality Frank B. Shaner did his last stint as host of the morning show on KUMU radio. After seven years, his...

Maui Mindset

The Valley Isle has some of the happiest seniors in Hawai‘i. Is it simply a Maui state of mind? Or is there more to it? The fact that each year people from all over the world move to Maui to retire must say something…or perhaps it says a lot. During a recent...

Fun for Life at the Y

For generations, the Y has provided a place of wellness and community bonding for Oahu residents from across the island’s economic, social and age groups. In keeping with this tradition, the Y is now making a name for itself among local seniors. With similar...