December 2020 – January 2021

December 2020 – January 2021

he December 2020-January 2021 issue of Generations Magazine explores Chinese-American soldiers who served the United States with dignity during World War II but have never received their medals. Kathlyn Clore brings the issue and several soldiers’ stories to light. You’ll also read about age-related muscle loss, Covid testing, safe family activities for the holidays as well as caregiving tips at Christmas. You’ll also get a couple of tasty recipes for our partners’ kitchens, including Aloha Fried Rice!

October – November 2020

October – November 2020

The October-November issue of Generations Magazine features the heartwarming story of popular Hawaii performer Kalani Pe’a’s grandmother and her progression into dementia from Alzheimerʻs. You’ll also read about help that’s available to kūpuna during the pandemic; a story on how the power of music helps those with dementia; we have some hearing tips for the Covid-19 days; and you’ll learn about “Purpose Pals,” a kūpuna-youth connection.

Managing Complex Care at Home

An increasing number of family caregivers are performing more complex medical care for their family members at home. According to Home Alone Revisited: Family Caregivers Providing Complex Care, a report prepared jointly by AARP and the United Hospital Fund, there is an increase in the number of family caregivers performing tasks that would, in the past, have been provided under the direct supervision of a medical professional.

Needs Planning During a Pandemic

I recently received a call from a concerned parent of an adult special needs child. Her son was recently diagnosed with schizophrenia, refuses to take his medication and has been living on the street. Unable to physically care for her child and experiencing a health scare of her own, she decided it was time to get “her ducks in order” and contacted our office. Her main wish is to continue to provide financially for her son’s present and future care without disrupting his governmental disability benefits.

Cybercrime Claims

One of the most common problem I encounter investigating a cybercrime is that the reporting person and/or victim fail to provide any records and/or documentation to support their claim that they had been victimized — more so in cases involving online fraud. One of the simplest and quickest methods of documentation is printing out the webpage offer, sale or service.

Hiring a Caregiver is Tricky

You may be tempted to treat a caregiver as a “private contractor” in order to avoid the humbug of tax withholding and buying the right insurance policies. You would do so at your peril. The IRS and the state will take the position that the caregiver is an  employee, that you are an employer and that all of the legal obligations that attach to those labels apply to your situation.

More Than Just a Friendly Thrift Shop

The Assistance League of Hawaii (ALH) is an all-volunteer, nonprofit organization with 100-plus members and volunteers who strive to make a difference to the people of Hawai‘i. The ALH Thrift Shop in Honolulu continues to be the primary source of funding for its philanthropic programs. The shop is staffed and managed entirely by member volunteers. All monetary donations and thrift shop profits stay in Hawai‘i.

Get the Most Out of Medicare

Have you found the right Medicare plan yet? If so, stay with it. If not, you can enroll, disenroll, or change plans from Oct. 15 to Dec. 7 during the Medicare Annual Election Period. Every year, plan features and prescription coverage change, so you should practice due diligence to discover what fits your current needs best.

Your Medicare Options for 2021

Each year, Oct. 15 through Dec. 7 is the Medicare Annual Election Period (AEP). During AEP, you will have the opportunity to explore and choose your Medicare coverage for 2021. You will have many choices, which includes selecting a Medicare Advantage plan or staying with your current option. Even if you are satisfied with your current option, it is important to review your Medicare plan during AEP.

Caregivers’ Tips for a Healthy Smile

Most caregivers know good oral health is important at every age and is a clear indication of their patient’s overall health. Some things caregivers should look for are signs of change in the patient’s mouth. Has there been recent tooth loss, discoloration or dryness? Often, seniors may experience those conditions, which affects how they digest their food or indicates other health problems.

SEED for the Holidays

The holiday season is a time of joy, but for many, it’s a challenging time as well. When the body holds too much tension and emotional energy, it can affect the immune system, making a person more prone to illness, as well as depression. And while we all want to enjoy this time, if we’re not proactive in taking care of ourselves, we may not feel like  celebrating.

Decision-Making Positions for Caretakers

Guardianship, conservatorship, trustee, power of attorney, agent, healthcare surrogate and other critical decision-making positions in the life of a senior or an adult with disabilities are a complicated mixture of ethics, law and common sense. Many caregivers, however, have little or no training in these areas and can find themselves in awkward and unnerving positions.

Dementia Patients, Caregivers & COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected everyone in some way. But our most vulnerable population, our senior citizens — especially those with dementia — are being particularly challenged. Our normal routines have been altered during the pandemic. This can be devastating for dementia patients, who thrive on the consistency of a regular routine.

Caregiving During COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic has all of us dealing with additional stressors in life, and many of us may
find that our abilities to deal with conflict and issues are short-fused. People living with dementia (PLWD) rely on their care partners to provide assistance with activities of daily living with kindness and compassion. PLWD also require mental stimulation, socialization and a reason to live just as much as you and I do. COVID-19 has changed our world into a place where we no longer feel safe, and social distancing has left many people feeling lonely, depressed and isolated.

Dementia & the Power of Music

Music is often the background of many of our memories. We grow up hearing it on the radio, on TV and in concerts. We sang in school and at special events. We often associate certain songs with our relationships, happy memories, sad memories, growing up and different seasons of life. Because of its constant presence in our lives, music is deeply woven into our memories, and can offer hope and helpful tools to those whose memories are fading.

Organized. Happy. Safe.

As we age, staying organized and living in an uncluttered space can help reduce the stress of transitioning into different phases of life. Many seniors find themselves needing or wanting to downsize from a family home to a smaller space, such as an apartment, retirement community or multigenerational family space. Taking the time to sort through possessions accumulated over the years will make downsizing or aging in place less stressful and improve your overall health.

What’s Happening to Papa?

Pomai has become worried as she sees Papa, her grandfather, become more forgetful. She wants Papa to play with her, but he is losing his memory and is no longer able to make poi with her or take her to the beach. In Pomai and Her Papa: Growing Up with Memory Loss and Holding On to What Matters Most, a short, illustrated storybook, Pomai sets off on her journey to learn how to help Papa and her family.

Help Is On The Way During COVID-19

With the reopening of the state after shutdowns mandated by local government in recent months, kūpuna and other vulnerable people have become more fearful of venturing out into the community to shop and run errands as the coronavirus continues to spread with more people out in public. The demand for food, supplies and assistance has grown in response to unemployment. An increasing number of kūpuna say they do not have sufficient resources to feed themselves.