No matter where we stand, when people close to us die, a moment of personal truth emerges based on our perspective.

When we lose someone dear to us, we undergo a time of deep connection to those who are still living and to ourselves. We grieve. We rejoice. We replay special moments — laughing and crying together. We feel sadness and often regret. There is no right or wrong way to endure this transition.

Thoughts from a Daughter of a Mom

“When my mom died, it hit me… we sat going through jewelry and clothes in her closet… Each of us sisters shared bereavement, but each of us grieved differently. We expressed disappointment and sadness, summing up the personality of Mom in our own way, voicing incomplete messages like, “‘I wish I said,’ ‘I wish I did…”.

To live and die without regret means to take this time to work backward — to reverse-engineer those memories step-by-step and fully express our thoughts; clear up any incomplete actions that we had hoped to carry out.

We can’t put off tending to sadness or regret because each memory can become a constant replay: “I should have, could have, would have,” cluttering our minds. Feelings often plague a grieving survivor for many years — or for life.

Take time today to reinvigorate your relationships and connect with your loved ones by being grateful and forgiving. Live rich and treasured lives together. You can do it with a little help.

 


Life Coach Village, LLC
2383 Beckwith St., Honolulu | 808-372-3478
ap@annettepang.com | www.annettepang.com

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