The Many Facets of Dementia

Alzheimer’s Disease and dementia — isn’t that the same thing? The simple answer is no. Dementia is an umbrella term for the different types of diseases that affect the brain. Alzheimer’s Disease is only one form of dementia. Also on the list we have Lewy body...

What Is Auricular Medicine?

Auricular medicine is a highly developed, independent system of medicine recently rediscovered and revived as a major modality in the Chinese healthcare system. Thousands of years ago, it was discovered that the ears themselves contain nerve and acupuncture points...

The Holiday Blues

It’s hard to imagine how the holidays could be anything but joyous. Yet, for many, this time of year can trigger the holiday blues — temporary feelings of sadness or anxiety. Feeling blue is completely normal, though there are a few easy way you can boost your mood....

Unexpected Turn of Events

In March, during a mainland trip to visit our college daughter, I started receiving phone calls from old family friends whom I haven’t heard from in years. What I thought were surprise hellos were concerned calls. My mother, Kimiko Suzuki, 88, had reached out to them...

The Search for Ancestors

I’ve been researching my ancestors for about 20 years. On my Hawaiian side, I’ve gone back five generations, and three generations on my Filipino side. I get so excited when I connect the dots in my family tree and discover a new family member, because I now have a...

Diabetes Treatment: East Meets West

By James Carter, L.Ac An estimated 30 million people in America have type 2 diabetes and that number is increasing each year. Although type 2 diabetes affects many different systems and functions of the body, the most commonly known effect is its disruption of the...

National Patient Safety Goals

Most seniors I meet say they prefer to age in place and live at home for as long as they can. Who wouldn’t want that, right? But living out your life safely at home may require a bit of help and experience. Home healthcare is particularly suited here; clients can manage their care with medical professionals to help make safer and more informed decisions.

Gregory Pai at Manoa Gallery

Tucked in a quiet corner in Manoa Valley, Manoa Gallery is a neighborhood gem where fine arts and crafts by senior Hawai‘i artists Gregory Pai, Russell Lowrey, Cora Yee, Richard A Cooke III, Dennis Morton and Barbara Thompson reveal that inspiration and creativity never get old.

A New Cave for the Hawai‘i Men’s Shed

Back in late 2015 at a Rotary club meeting, I learned about the “men’s shed” program. To me, that term conjured up an image of an old workshop or storage building next to a residence. I was corrected by a fellow Rotarian who described the Men’s Shed as a club made up of senior men drawn by fellowship, and the desire to work on personal and group projects.

Reflecting on What is Important

I had been preparing to write about the importance of conversation in estate planning while watching a documentary on HBO called Cries From Syria. In the midst of this heart-wrenching story about the Syrian situation—a girl, who could not have been older than 8 or 9—facing death from starvation and preparing her will. It had nothing to do with money.

The Aloha State: A Model for Kūpuna Care

Never in the history of humankind have so many people lived so long. Anthropologists estimate that on average, Neanderthals lived little more than 20 years; only a small percent reached 40. In 15th century Europe, the average life expectancy reached a scant 35 years. Around the turn of the 20th century, however, advances in public health (clean water, waste disposal, vaccinations) decreased infectious diseases, greatly reducing infant and child mortality and increasing life expectancy.

Help Hawaii Meals on Wheels Keep Rolling

Since 1979, Hawaii Meals on Wheels has been serving hot meals to the ku¯puna in need in our communities. The program started as a small committee formed by former State of Hawai‘i librarian Irmgard Hörmann and the Social Ministries Committee of the Lutheran Church of Honolulu. Over time, the organization grew as it sought to provide basic nutritional and human support to seniors who are unable to fully care for themselves. What started as two routes manned by six volunteers is now a collaborative effort involving 450 volunteers and over 50 routes that served more than 97,000 meals in 2016.

Caregivers Need Support, Too

Many of these supporters dutifully provide care without complaint. Yet, demands may start to take a toll and their own health may be compromised.t’s estimated there are more than 150,000 unpaid family caregivers in Hawai‘i. These valuable helpers are typically women in their early 60s who are caring for their husbands or elderly parents while still working. And that doesn’t take into account those who may occasionally care for their grandchildren, as well.

It’s Never Too Late to Learn

Henry Ford once said, “Anyone who stops learning is old, whether at 20 or 80; anyone who keeps learning stays young.”

Na Kupuna is a program that provides seniors an opportunity to do just that. As a part of the University of Hawaii’s Student Equity Excellence Diversity (SEED) initiative, Na Kupuna opens up college courses to seniors age 60 and older, which they can attend for free. About 650 senior citizens take advantage of this program every semester!

Pain Solutions with Acupuncture

by James Carter, L.Ac.  More than one in four Americans suffer from a chronic pain condition. Pain is not only physically debilitating, but also affects our emotional and mental health. The primary causes of chronic pain are injuries, inflammation, poor circulation...

CARE Act: New Law Helps Caregivers

A new law takes effect on July 1 that will make it a bit easier for caregivers when some-one is admitted or discharged from the hospital. The Caregiver Advise, Record, Enable (CARE) Act gives family caregivers three basic rights that will help with admission, discharge and care of a loved one as they transition back home.

The Best is Yet to Be

On a frosty winter’s morning, my fellow
seminarian, Cal Chinen, picked me up in
his old beige Volvo. We drove across the
Columbia River from Portland, Oregon, to Washougal,
a small town at the foothills of the Cascade
Mountains in Washington State. We were responding
to a senior citizen’s request to do some yardwork.

Honor Our Elders

As the years roll by, it is not always easy to keep perspective on the people who mean the most to us. Sometimes we forget to show the appreciation they are due. But it is important to remember to express our love and honor our senior citizens while they are still...

‘Let’s Play Ball!’

You hear it all the time: To stay healthy, we need to stay active. Yet as we get older, it can be difficult to find the energy and motivation to get out and exercise. Makua Ali‘i, O‘ahu’s premier senior softball league, provides mature athletes an opportunity to stay...

A Lesson in Patience and Gratitude

My mother had always been a healthy, determined and spirited woman who was guided by her faith. With a high degree of humor and a strong work ethic, my mother, Tokiko Suda, along with my father, Sakae, raised four children and operated several restaurants in Honolulu....

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